Article by U.S. News & World Report

“Many boomers want to move to a smaller house or a less-expensive neighborhood to free up cash for other retirement priorities.

Many baby boomers say they want to retire to the Sunbelt. Most of the rest of us – those who have recently retired or who are planning to retire – want to stay closer to home. (There are always a few who go against the grain and plan to retire in Minnesota or Maine.) But even homebodies expect that they’ll likely sell their old suburban home and move to new quarters, which may be less expensive, more comfortable and more appropriate for their new stage of life as retired empty nesters.

So whether you’re in Sarasota, Florida, Saratoga, New York, or Sausalito, California, here are seven ways baby boomers are looking at their retirement home.

1. Boomers want to pay off their mortgage. Most baby boomers, especially older boomers born before 1955, own their own home. They’ve been paying a mortgage, faithfully and relentlessly, for most of their adult lives. For these people, a primary goal is to finally pay off the mortgage and own their home free and clear. For many, paying off the mortgage is an important threshold – a crucial step they feel they need to take before they can even consider retirement.

2. They want to lower their housing expenses. It’s not just the mortgage. For many boomers, the equity they’ve built up in their home is the largest asset they have. According to a recent Merrill Lynch survey of 6,000 adults, on average, home equity among homeowners age 65 and older is more than $200,000. Many boomers look forward to moving to a smaller house or a less-expensive neighborhood to free up some of their equity to pay for travel, medical expenses, home renovations or other “extra” expenses they know they’ll face at some point in the years ahead.

3. Boomers want more convenience. A smaller home sometimes means less maintenance, less work and less worry. But not always. Most boomers have “been there, done that” with older homes that have history and “character.” They want modern appliances, energy-efficient doors and windows, spacious kitchens, an open floor plan with lots of light and fresh, new décor. Boomers are done with the “shabby chic” look of the 1990s. And a lot of them, suffering from bad ankles, bad knees and bad hips, are opting for one-story housing.”

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